Fracture Care

Fracture Care

Arm Fracture

A broken arm is a common injury. About one in every 20 fractures involve the upper arm bone (humerus). Children are more likely to break the lower arm bones (radius and ulna).Falling on an outstretched hand or being in a car crash or some other type of accident is usually the cause of a broken arm.

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Shoulder

Triangular, mobile, and protected by a complex system of surrounding muscles, the shoulder blade (scapula) is rarely broken. Scapula fractures represent less than 1% of all broken bones. High-energy, blunt trauma, such as that experienced in a motorcycle or motor vehicle collision or falling from significant height, can fracture the scapula and cause other major injuries, including broken ribs or damage to the head, lungs, or spinal cord.

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Elbow

When you bend your elbow, you can easily feel its “tip,” a bony prominence that extends from one of the lower arm bones (the ulna). That tip is called the olecranon (oh-lek’-rah-nun). It is positioned directly under the skin of the elbow, without much protection from muscles or other soft tissues. It can easily break if you experience a direct blow to the elbow or fall on a bent elbow.

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Clavicle( collar bone)

The collarbone is considered part of the shoulder. It helps connect the arm to the body. The collarbone lies above several important nerves and blood vessels. These vital structures are rarely injured when the collarbone breaks. The collarbone is a long bone, and most breaks occur in the middle section.

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Cervical (Neck) Fracture

The seven bones in the neck are the cervical vertebrae. They support the head and connect it to the shoulders and body. A fracture, or break, in one of the cervical vertebrae is commonly called a broken neck. Cervical fractures usually result from high-energy trauma, such as automobile crashes or falls. Athletes are also at risk.

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Spine Fracture

A spinal fracture is a serious injury. The most common fractures of the spine occur in the thoracic (midback) and lumbar spine (lower back) or at the connection of the two (thoracolumbar junction). These fractures are typically caused by high-velocity accidents, such as a car crash or fall from height.

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Hand Fracture

Fractures of the hand can occur in either the small bones of the fingers (phalanges) or the long bones (metacarpals). They can result from a twisting injury, a fall, a crush injury, or direct contact in sports.

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Scaphoid Fracture of the Wrist

The scaphoid is one of the small bones in the wrist. It is the wrist bone that is most likely to break. The scaphoid is located on the thumb side of the wrist, in the area where the wrist bends.

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Hip Fracture

A hip fracture is a break in the upper quarter of the femur (thigh) bone. The extent of the break depends on the forces that are involved. The type of surgery used to treat a hip fracture is primarily based on the bones and soft tissues affected or on the level of the fracture.

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Patellar (Kneecap) Fractures

Because your kneecap (patella) acts like a shield for your knee joint, it can easily be broken. Falling directly onto your knee, for example, is a common cause of patellar fractures.These fractures are serious injuries and often require surgery to heal. Over the long term, they may cause arthritis in the knee.

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Proximal Tibia and other Leg Fractures

A fracture, or break, in the upper part of the shinbone (tibia) may result from a low-energy injury, such as a fall from a height, or from a high-energy injury, such as a motor vehicle accident. Proper identification and management of these injuries will help to restore limb function (strength, motion, and stability) and lessen the risk of arthritis.

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Ankle Fractures

“I broke my ankle.” A broken ankle is also known as an ankle “fracture.” This means that one or more of the bones that make up the ankle joint are separated into pieces. There may be ligaments damaged as well. Simply put, the more bones that are broken, the more unstable the ankle becomes.

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Toe and Forefoot Fractures

Nearly one-fourth of all the bones in your body are in your feet, which provide you with both support and movement. A broken (fractured) bone in your forefoot (metatarsals) or in one of your toes (phalanges) is often painful but rarely disabling. Most of the time, these injuries heal without operative treatment.

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